« October 2007 »
S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31


ralph haenel, hänelwingtsun, wing tsun kung fu instructor, author, publisher, self-defense expert Sifu Ralph Haenel, learning and teaching Wing Tsun Kung Fu since 1984
Changing lives, one punch at a time.
Contact me


Book "The Reality of Self-Defense!" by Ralph Haenel
Buy it Now!

the reality of self-defense! - book by ralph haenel, wing tsun kung fu instructor

The Reality of Self-Defense! by Ralph Haenel: buy this book on Lulu.com


On Sale Now!
The practical strength training guide for Wing Tsun Kung Fu (Wing Chun, Ving Tsun) practitioners and fitness enthusiasts.
Now with bonus chapter: Kettlebell training! INFO

Strength training for martial artists, espcially Wing Tsun/Wing Chun practitioners, a book by Ralph Haenel, with kettlebell training chapter.

The Practical Strength Training Guide for Self-Defense & Martial Arts by Ralph Haenel: buy this book on Lulu.com


On Sale Now!
Siu-Nim-Tau, a Wing Tsun Kung Fu form for WingTsun (Wing Chun, Ving Tsun) practitioners and fitness enthusiasts.
Training notes on the journey between Kung Fu Beginner and Master INFO

Siu-Nim-Tau, a Wing Tsun Kung Fu form for Wing Tsun/Wing Chun practitioners, a book by Chris Chinfen

Siu-Nim-Tau, a Wing Tsun Kung Fu form by Chris Chinfen: buy this book on Lulu.com


Coming 2016
Kung Fu - The Workout; an easy to follow result driven guide for beginners and fitness enthusiasts. INFO

Century old Kung Fu exercises for all fitness enthusiasts, a book by Ralph Haenel


Coming 2016
WingTsun-CoreConcepts, Beyond tradition and technique - training concepts for Wing Tsun Kung Fu students and instructors! INFO

WingTsun-CoreConcepts a book by Ralph Haenel - Beyond tradition and technique, training concepts for Wing Tsun Kung Fu students and instructors



Entries by Topic
All topics  «
Wing Tsun Kung Fu Vancouver Blog
Wednesday, 10 October 2007
Is Wing Tsun really that frustrating? Why does any progress appear to be so slow? (part 1 of 3)
wing tsun kung fu vancouver, self-defense studio vancouverOne of the common occurrences we all experience throughout our Wing Tsun career is frustration over what seems to be incredibly slow progress. Is this actually the case, is it more difficult to learn Wing Tsun than other martial arts, or is there another explanation?

Just recently I have been asked about what to do, to avoid being too tired at the end of a lesson. Also very common are questions like: “Will I ever get better?”, or “When will I finally progress?”

Well, to compare it; many martial arts schools sell, instead of memberships, seemingly prestigious black belts with slogans like: “Get your black belt in one year”. Many advertise with teaching you literally hundreds or even thousands of techniques, to be ready for just about any scenario. Or so they make you think.

What about competition sports? Martial arts competitors usually have enough time to get into shape, often they know their opponents, have studied their behaviour on video, and prepare special fight plans. Even the so-called no-rules fights assure that no third parties get involved, that no weapons are used, what type of clothing or shoes are worn, they guarantee that the fight area is limited and clean, providing special flooring or mats, that quite a set of rules is being enforced by a referee.

Above points and more, like weight, age, experience, and intent of actions, the element of surprise, mind games and intimidation tactics of the aggressor - nothing is on your side in a real-life scenario.

But one step back to typical martial arts training. I hear it quite often, that students talk about the empowerment, the good feeling, the joy of achievement when training other martial arts. Why is that so? Is Wing Tsun that different?
Quite a few martial art schools practice pre-arranged partner exercises, where you can’t fail. Many don’t even allow any contact whatsoever. Sometimes you are not even allowed to talk to each other during exercises.
On the downside this builds up the inability to deal with violence, ending up being incapable of hurting the aggressor, and teaches unrealistic technique pattern, impossible to apply under unknown conditions.

In the martial arts school it works. Isn’t that great, limited exercises routines, no physical contact, no talking, what can go wrong? Nothing, that’s why it feels so good. You have the feeling of getting better and better. Nothing spoils your progress.
Unfortunately, this is a very dangerous assumption. Without wanting to paint the picture too black; Reality strikes often with horrible violence. Fighting for your life is not a sport!

Again, what is so different about Wing Tsun?
For one, especially in Wing Tsun we experience that talent and skill take you only so far. Over the years one finds out that it takes four virtues to truly advance. Every hardworking student begins to understand how focus, commitment, perseverance and determination drive you to excel.

The Wing Tsun instructor has the difficult task to take on the persona of different assailants, to pose as the attacker according to the progressive Wing Tsun programs and to point out every mistake, to expose every gap, to raise awareness of every conceivable scenario the real life attack might put you through.
It is the job, the responsibility of a dependable Wing Tsun instructor to support your progress by continuously pointing out your weak spots. This is (most of the times) not fun.
In Wing Tsun we all learn to prepare for a completely different type of circumstances, for real life, Period.

That is the reason why we never stand still; never let you rest on skills you have achieved, why we push you to new levels of stress training, eventually enabling you to make rational decisions within fractions of seconds. This is how you learn to act under heavy pressure in a high risk situation.

One of my instructors, a former professional boxer, rounded it up: “If it feels good, it ain’t Wing Tsun”.
A responsible Wing Tsun instructor drives you to the point of exhaustion at the end of a lesson without neglecting the technical training, without forgetting the fine-tuning.

You fight as you train. That is why every progress is yet again improved through putting more stress on you, by exposing you to a higher level of difficulties. In return if may feel like a standstill, because you are still being corrected.

Everyone with enough patience will eventually discover their enormous progress, especially when working with beginners in class, who will complement you on your skills, who will look up to what you have achieved already.

One instructor told me once, during a for me very frustrating training session: “You know, when I face Sifu, I too feel as if it is my first day in Wing Tsun Kung Fu. He controls me at will.”
Look at it the other way. If your Wing Tsun instructor, even after years, can still turn up the heat, lead you into new high-pressure scenarios, makes you sweat, leaves you tired at the end of a session, it means that he is good enough to teach you for years to come.

Otherwise you might possibly be wasting time and money.

In conclusion, how we train Wing Tsun and how the progress is measured cannot be compared to the typical workout in most martial arts schools.
Believe me. One develops over time an appreciation for this unique training, to be fit for survival in life.

wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenelOpen House wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenelWingTsunKungFuWear.com wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenelPhoto Album wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenelKungFutheWorkout.com
wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenel
Buy the Self-Defense Book wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenelReaders Reviews wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenelBlog Archives

Bookmark the blog you have just read:

Posted by ralph haenel at 4:58 PM PDT
Updated: Tuesday, 16 October 2007 8:38 PM PDT
Thursday, 4 October 2007
Nine pearls, three springs, one wave punch, and a lot of chi power, by Gary Kaiser - part 4 of 4
self defense training vancouver, wing tsun kung fuLet’s add one more in our search of analogies for Wing Tsun’s whiplash-like force, fluid and wave-like power, previously explained through old concepts as the "seven joints" or "nine pearls".
Now, another visual analogy would be seeing your body as a coiled spring. Each coil would be represented by one of the body's major joints. A rising step/punch would be the action where the spring extends; a falling step would be the pulling back action.

In Wing Tsun Kung Fu we lift our head up, while trying to point our tailbone downwards. This is similar to Tai Chi's concept of "lift the spirit, flow the chi heavenwards". Doing this action tends to stretch the spine so that the vertebrae are separated as far as possible (good for preventing back pain) and this 'flattens' the lower back. A flat lower back gives the body a much better mechanical advantage in using the hip flexors. These muscles are extremely strong, possibly as strong as either quadriceps (thighs) or lats, and often under-used by martial art practitioners.

This extra leverage and range of movement are shown in the following. Stand straight and turn your torso, many people can turn almost 90 degrees and the move seems smooth and easy. Now bend forwards from your waist so your torso is at about a 45 degree angle. Try turning form this position and you will see that you cannot turn as far, and that the action is not as easy. As far as mechanical advantage, imagine a football lineman bent forwards like this, and he puts out an arm to grab the opponent running by. Stress in this case typically goes through the body, but the weak points are the shoulder, lower back and knees. The joints are not weak per se, but since he is not facing and square and level to the target, there is a far greater shear factor on the joints. The muscles may not be able to hold these extended positions, and injury may occur. In Wing Tsun terms, this misalignment does not allow as much energy transfer i.e. power for hitting.

Also if your back is straight, this allows the stomach, intercostal muscles between the ribs, and chest more room to expand and move, and be involved in adding power to the action (rising punch). Or the opposite, to compress during a falling step/punch.

Your imagination is an incredible tool and can help you shape the success of your training. Without going further into the part of sports psychology in connection with visualization, we simply want to state that old sayings, poetic martial arts terminology at times just has to be unlocked, to produce great training results.

Next week. Join us for a multiple-part series under the title: "When does Self-Defense start? or The very first line of Defense!"

wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenelOpen House wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenelWingTsunKungFuWear.com wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenelPhoto Album wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenelKungFutheWorkout.com
wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenel
Buy the Self-Defense Book wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenelReaders Reviews wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenelBlog Archives

Bookmark the blog you have just read:

Posted by ralph haenel at 1:24 AM PDT
Updated: Tuesday, 16 October 2007 8:42 PM PDT
Wednesday, 3 October 2007
Nine pearls, three springs, one wave punch, and a lot of chi power, by Gary Kaiser - part 3 of 4
self defence studio vancouver, wing tsun kung fuHere a few ideas in regard to the rising step with punch.

1. The ankle joint which is stretched open during the step, closes to a smaller angle as the knee (and upper body) moves forwards over it.

2. The knees straighten somewhat, propelling the upper body forwards and upwards.

3. The hips drive in and up, moving the torso into the target.

4. The torso expands as the ribs separate, and the main bends of the spine straighten upwards.

5. The relaxed and rounded back allows the shoulders to move in and extend forward.

6. The previously low (protecting) elbow straightens while advancing, eventually lengthening the arm when hitting the target.

7. The wrist moves forwards, transferring power to the knuckles of the hand which in turn strike the target.

Test it yourself. If you keep your elbow low and put your upright fist solid against a wall, you should feel a linkage back to the sole of the foot.

While in this position do an isometric exercise. Slightly increase the pressure, joint by joint, starting at the ankle and moving up. The muscle work should feel even or smooth throughout the different body parts. You should feel a bracing or linkage from the ground to the fist. More experienced students may be able to add a feeling of a spiral (or torquing) motion to the push or power-flow through the body. The resultant power at the hand is magnified by each increment of movement through the "seven joints" (or "nine pearls").

wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenelOpen House wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenelWingTsunKungFuWear.com wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenelPhoto Album wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenelKungFutheWorkout.com
wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenel
Buy the Self-Defense Book wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenelReaders Reviews wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenelBlog Archives

Bookmark the blog you have just read:

Posted by ralph haenel at 9:40 AM PDT
Updated: Tuesday, 16 October 2007 8:43 PM PDT
Tuesday, 2 October 2007
Nine pearls, three springs, one wave punch, and a lot of chi power, by Gary Kaiser - part 2 of 4
brian yam, trainer at wing tsun kung fu vancouverWing Tsun Kung Fu’s 'wave' punch.

Generating power in your punch involves many areas of practise. Here we want to focus upon the 'feel' of the move by analogy and by specifics in regard to the physical power sources. Visualising in slow motion snapping a wet towel, or a bullwhip, we could see that each part of the flexible material consecutively bows out and then straightens up.

Wing Tsun Kung Fu's rising and falling steps might be seen as the hinges of a step ladder. When you snap open the ladder this hinge snaps into a locked position. It is a smooth, yet powerful whip feeling to the motion. If we try to feel this in all the joints of the body, in a flow from the foot to the fist, this creates a wave like motion.

To understand the many joint concepts: think of throwing a baseball. First imagine just using your wrist and no other movement.

Next, add in some elbow action, this should increase your distance covered and the speed of the ball.

Shoulder action is next; rotation of the shoulder makes a huge difference in the resulting action. Velocity and distance are noticeably increased, i.e. there is more power. Waist/hip rotation should add to the result.

Knee action straightens the legs, resulting in a push forwards. Ankle bend should move all the body above this area towards the target. An extreme version of this is seen in an actual step. Consider running towards the target, this will add more speed, power, and distance. If you were running along the top of a moving surface, say standing on top of a moving train, this would add even more to the equation.

Each joint in the body is adding to the end speed and power. There is usually a specific sequence of which muscles move which joints and when. Keeping upright, square, and relaxed allows for an easier and more complete movement.

wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenelOpen House wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenelWingTsunKungFuWear.com wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenelPhoto Album wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenelKungFutheWorkout.com
wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenel
Buy the Self-Defense Book wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenelReaders Reviews wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenelBlog Archives

Bookmark the blog you have just read:

Posted by ralph haenel at 11:22 AM PDT
Updated: Tuesday, 16 October 2007 8:45 PM PDT
Monday, 1 October 2007
Nine pearls, three springs, one wave punch, and a lot of chi power, by Gary Kaiser - part 1 of 4
self defence seminar vancouver, wing tsun kung fuphoto left: punching exercises during a self-defense seminar at Wing Tsun Kung Fu Vancouver

Starting today enjoy reading a few thoughts by Gary Kaiser. Click here to read bios of the members of our trainer team.

Many older martial art teaching methods talk in a very poetic fashion about skills like 'wave power'. Terminology like the 'nine pearls' or the 'three springs' is used. Often these relatively vague descriptions lead to misinterpretations, and lead to claims of magical powers, energies, and other unverified claims.

But the masters of old were extremely realism orientated. So what does this kind of talk actually mean, if anything??? How can we modern students of Wing Tsun Kung Fu translate this to useful training concepts?

The nine pearls is a metaphor for using the major joints of the body in an efficient method to generate power, bracing, and flow. It refers to the shoulder, elbow and wrist joints of the arm (first spring), the 3 curves or bows of the spine (second spring), and the ankle, knee, and hip joints of the leg (third spring). The waist or belly area usually works in conjunction with the horizontal rotation of the hips.

In explanations of power development within the Wing Tsun Kung Fu system you can also hear the term ‘power of the three joints’. It is used in reference to the shoulder, elbow and wrist connection, or also indicates the hip, knee and ankle chain of power.
Furthermore you may have come across the ‘power of the seven joints’, which especially in British Columbia should not be misunderstood. The ‘power of the seven joints’ is a term which can give us a visualization of how muscles, ligaments, tendons throughout the body create a wave-like power flow from ankle, knee, hip, spine, shoulder, elbow and wrist.

... to be continued tomorrow!

wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenelOpen House wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenelWingTsunKungFuWear.com wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenelPhoto Album wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenelKungFutheWorkout.com
wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenel
Buy the Self-Defense Book wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenelReaders Reviews wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenelBlog Archives

Bookmark the blog you have just read:

Posted by ralph haenel at 2:06 PM PDT
Updated: Tuesday, 16 October 2007 8:41 PM PDT
Sunday, 30 September 2007

Blog Archives - Choose your topic! 

UPDATED: Sunday, May 22nd 2011

Come back often and find a listing of selected past blog entries, short articles about and around Wing Tsun Kung Fu:

Six great ways to enjoy your WingTsun training - Plus ideas for three corporate Kung Fu classes
Seven overlooked points to improve your Wing Tsun (martial arts) training
The Yip Man effect: Wing Tsun / Wing Chun flying around the world! (Rose Chan Ka Wun)
"Craft, Cooking, and Kung Fu" by Adrian Law

Setting foot for the first time into a martial arts school?
Tough time, trying to make it back to classes after a break?
Tips and lessons learned from Grumpy George and others!

Lightning fast, the secrets of Kung Fu! What did Carl Douglas and George Harrison have in common?
Are you a “dream ranger”? Or do you at times submit to the dark side?
I have been bad, very bad ... the secret life of a martial arts instructor.
More than 28 tips on how to be a better (Wing Tsun Kung Fu) trainer!
Is there anything a trainer can’t do?

Breaks, motivation and different goals. Martial arts are no different than life.
Wing Tsun Kung Fu training tips
Three ways to improve your martial arts (Wing Tsun Kung Fu) training and two examples to learn from!

9-part Interview with WingTsun grandmaster Leung Ting
Health & Lifestyle Channel, Hostess Zhao Ling, Hong Kong Cable TV Channel # 27

Leung Jan's Gulao village Wing Chun
2-part Wing Chun documentary - The home of descendants of Wah The Money Changer

Wing Chun documentary - 5-part Wing Chun documentation by channel TVB, Hong Kong
How to have a punch like a flimsy noodle!
or ♫ Kung Fu in the morning ♫ Kung Fu all day ... ♫

To Kung Fu or not Kung Fu! - Should I train with injuries?
The Tan-Sau of death and other secret techniques of Wing Tsun Kung Fu - part 2 of 2
or The 14-hour Chi-Sau marathon, thoughts on a Wing Tsun training method

SifuMania – or who or what is a Kung Fu Sifu anyway?

Ramblings about Freedom, Commitment, Bruises and Anniversary Cake
How much art is in your martial art?
Ramblings about martial ART, seminar feedback, exercise variety, Wing Tsun Chi-Sau, teaching skills and learning methods.

How much fitness and prior martial arts skills are needed to learn Wing Tsun Kung Fu?
The first 2009 Wing Tsun Seminar in Calgary - by Tony Leung
The Tan-Sau of death and other secret techniques of Wing Tsun Kung Fu - part 1 of 2
or The 10-hour Chi-Sau marathon, thoughts on a Wing Tsun training method

Alfred's story or the 3 P.'s - Martial arts training, a way of life.
A Facebook story that's hard to believe ...
Is experience overrated? What does a Wing Tsun trainer do?
Time for a New Year's Tradition - Have some fun! (Dinner for One)
Simple & Effective Kettlebell Training for Wing Tsun Kung Fu - 45 minute video presentation

Kung Fu for Manager - Lunch & Learn Seminar at TELUS Vancouver
Simple & Effective Kettlebell Training for Wing Tsun Kung Fu
Fitness trainer, kettlebell expert (RKC) and now Wing Tsun Kung Fu Instructor
Is Wing Tsun only Wing Tsun and nothing but Wing Tsun? - part 1 of 2
New downloadable Wing Tsun Kung Fu Vancouver brochure

Wing Tsun at the beach in beautiful Vancouver, British Columbia
Motivation, Music & Kung Fu? And a great Wing Tsun school in Calgary!
A summer (Kung Fu) seminar moment
About different training methods - summer seminar at Wing Tsun Vancouver
Ideas for your Wing Tsun Chi-Sau training - part 3 of 4

Ideas for your Wing Tsun Chi-Sau training - part 2 of 4
Ideas for your Wing Tsun Chi-Sau training - part 1 of 4
Wing Tsun Kung Fu seminar impressions - Exercises in adaptation.
2008 Jumpstart Seminar at Wing Tsun Kung Fu Vancouver
Lunch & learn Kung Fu seminar at Envision Financial

Looking back and forward, and everything in between - part 1 (Kung Fu journey)
Benefit your employees! Lunch break self-defense seminars, a great motivational tool.
Learning and teaching tools in Wing Tsun Kung Fu
Fit For Self-Defense - Wing Tsun form training
When does Self-Defense start? or The very first line of Defense! (part 3 of 3)

When does Self-Defense start? or The very first line of Defense! (part 2 of 3)
When does Self-Defense start? or The very first line of Defense! (part 1 of 3)
Is Wing Tsun really that frustrating? Why does any progress appear to be so slow? (part 3 of 3)
Is Wing Tsun really that frustrating? Why does any progress appear to be so slow? (part 2 of 3)
Is Wing Tsun really that frustrating? Why does any progress appear to be so slow? (part 1 of 3)

Nine pearls, three springs, one wave punch, and a lot of chi power, by Gary Kaiser - part 4 of 4
Nine pearls, three springs, one wave punch, and a lot of chi power, by Gary Kaiser - part 3 of 4
Nine pearls, three springs, one wave punch, and a lot of chi power, by Gary Kaiser - part 2 of 4
Nine pearls, three springs, one wave punch, and a lot of chi power, by Gary Kaiser - part 1 of 4
A look into the Blog Archives - Choose your topic

What offers me more value, joining group classes or taking private lessons?
When does it end? The art of Wing Tsun.
Let's learn with each other
Concentration, Focus and Respect!
Lance Armstrong: "Pain is temporary, quitting is forever." - About exhausting Wing Tsun form training (ChiKung Siu-Nim-Tau)

How much training is too much? - example of home training schedule
Let there be pain! Well, how much? How real?
What is your goal today? (The Bruce Lee connection)
Visit to Yip Man Tong - Free download, courtesy of Wing Tsun Kung Fu Vancouver
Canadian Law and Self-defence, by Gary Hughes (part 3 of 3)

Canadian Law and Self-defence, by Gary Hughes (part 2 of 3)
Canadian Law and Self-defence, by Gary Hughes (part 1 of 3)
The Wing Tsun Kung Fu Seminar, by Mat Gilroy (part 2 of 2)
The Wing Tsun Kung Fu Seminar, by Mat Gilroy (part 1 of 2)
My Martial Arts Experience by Clarke Wood (part 2 of 2)

My Martial Arts Experience by Clarke Wood (part 1 of 2)
How to train with each other
The CoreConcepts of Wing Tsun Kung Fu
Starting out with an open mind
Trainer Team at Wing Tsun Kung Fu Vancouver

Nutrition videos, and the columns of Wing Tsun training
A few words about our ChiKung classes
Ease and simplicity of Wing Tsun Kung Fu
Seminar feedback, How to bring Chi-Sau to life!
Healthy critique?

Fred Astaire and Wing Tsun?
Seminar Weekend
ChiKung, the challenge
Wing Tsun punching methods
Which is the right Wing Chun?
(3-part mini series) Go to part 1, 2 & 3.

Missed classes?
Wing Tsun videos
Hall of Fame

 

wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenelOpen House wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenelWingTsunKungFuShop.com wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenelPhoto Album wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenelKungFutheWorkout.com
wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenel
Buy the Self-Defense Book wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenelReaders Reviews wing tsun kung fu blog, realistic self-defense for real people, by kung fu coach ralph haenelBlog Archives

Add to any service Add to any service

Posted by ralph haenel at 3:19 PM PDT
Updated: Sunday, 22 May 2011 8:48 PM PDT
Friday, 28 September 2007
What offers me more value, joining group classes or taking private lessons?

wing tsun kung fu vancouver, first canadian wing tsun branchphoto left: Brian leading a segment of our recent fall seminar

A lot of times I have been asked about what gives a better value, taking group or private classes. Of course one should first evaluate one's motivation, is it a mere hobby, or is the goal the exploration of the art of Wing Tsun Kung Fu? Most people start out with a focus on attaining the ability to defend themselves. Very soon the at times sobering reality sets in, that there is much more to acquiring self-defense skills than a set of techniques or even worse, the notion of “tricks”.

Private classes focus very much on the specific personal situation, the training needs of the student. It's a chance to work on details and get the undivided attention of the instructor. A continuous one-on-one work can lift you up to initially unimaginable levels of skill. It is also very challenging, don’t take this lightly, working on improving yourself session after session is very rewarding but also a tough task.

Yet group classes provide the necessary training time and helpful encounters with different students and their personalities. Here, in a friendly scenario, you might face already the problems of successfully communicating with your training partner. Asking your training partner for moderation, help with the exercise, can prove more challenging that it may seem at first.
This topic will be discussed in detail in the upcoming multiple-part series under the title: "When does Self-Defense start? or The very first line of Defense!"

Learning WingTsun Kung Fu is about gaining self-confidence, dealing with unpleasant situations, facing reality. Self-Defense abilities for the real world.
That is why a balanced mix of attending group classes as well as taking private lessons is the recommended solution. And let’s not forget about your home training, even if it's just minutes a day!


Posted by ralph haenel at 12:50 AM PDT
Thursday, 27 September 2007
When does it end? The art of Wing Tsun.
wing tsun kung fu vancouver instructor teamphoto left: some members of the trainer team (standing) Gary, Steve, Sifu Ralph, Nilo, Brian, Ciprian; (second row) Philip, Sia, Edmond, Sebastian, Rob, Tony

It has been a great week. It always motivates me as well, to see your dedication, to feel your enthusiasm. Congratulations to all who participated in our fall seminar, but especially to our members, who received their well-deserved promotions:
Tim Schofield 1.SG
Sarah McGowan 1.SG
Felix McGowan 1.SG
Jackie Ho 2.SG
Sam Ho 2.SG
William Chau 3.SG
Dave Zraly 3.SG
Michael Oleksuik 4.SG
Fred Lo 4.SG
David Livingstone 4.SG
Mansun Lui 7.SG
Adrian Law 7.SG
Philip Lee 12.SG
Tony Leung 12.SG
Siavash Panahandeh 12.SG
Sebastian Molnar 12.SG
Rob Grylls 12.SG

Someone told me last night: “… the fact is sinking in that now I am really at the higher levels and things only get harder. I really got to work harder.”; which reminds me of a little story of my own. At the beginning of the 90’s during my Sifu’s first seminar in East Germany, I received my certificate of the first instructor level. It made me proud; to be the first in the country and while seminar participants were applauding my Sifu was whispering to me: “This is only the beginning. Now you start your Wing Tsun journey.”
When is the studying, the interpretation of an art ever done, finished. I most certainly hope not anytime soon. I am learning and teaching Wing Tsun Kung Fu now since 1984 and it never get’s dull. So, keep discovering new aspects of your martial ART, keep interpreting the old Kung Fu forms, strategies and tactics, handed down over the centuries. Let it never end. Let’s share our knowledge and skills.
All the best to our members of the trainer team, who have reached the 12th Student Grade and begin to pursue their Technician Grade training.


Posted by ralph haenel at 12:01 AM PDT
Updated: Thursday, 27 September 2007 1:58 PM PDT
Wednesday, 26 September 2007
Let's learn with each other
team spirit, wing tsun kung fu vancouver, self-defense seminarphoto left: some of Monday night's seminar particpants

A word about testing for eligible members:
The following are just some of the factors in regard to who qualifies for testing, the promotion to the next student level:
- attendance of group classes, private lessons & previous seminars
- performance during the last months and weeks
- date and performance of last test
- understanding of the programs, which is often more important than the current performance of a particular technique
- feedback and/or questions I receive, which also tells me, if one is understanding the program

As I have said very often, it is for me (and for your progress) far more important how someone trains, if someone shows the effort, as opposed to possibly missing or forgetting a technique/drill/exercise here or there. A promotion is often the best motivation to step up to the next level of commitment, to take one's hobby more serious than before, to work harder for more satisfying benefits.

Often does the advancing into the next program produce a better inside view, lets us "suddenly" better understand previous programs, which in the end jumpstart's our progress, yields positive results, as opposed to remaining in the "old" program.

The programs are guidelines, not cast in stone, they are all pieces of a big puzzle, that will one day fit together and have produced a skill and knowledge of the complexity of self-defense, an understanding of the Wing Tsun system, the satisfaction of a successful hobby, a greater awareness of your body, your surroundings, improved health.

Let’s train and learn with each other!


Posted by ralph haenel at 12:01 AM PDT
Updated: Tuesday, 25 September 2007 9:57 PM PDT
Tuesday, 25 September 2007
Concentration, Focus and Respect!
self defense seminar at wing tsun kung fu vancouverIt was a pleasure to greet about 30 members of our school, the first Canadian Wing Tsun branch, for the opening evening of the fall seminar.

Beginning with selected segments of the Siu-Nim-Tau and Cham-Kiu form, chain punching in intervals, the focus of the evening was set on improving striking power. The aggressive use of punching techniques characterizes this specific system of Chinese boxing.

The partner exercises, which dominated the evening, put the spotlight on important elements of balance, distance, and timing as well as the imperative coordination of hand and foot work. The repeated execution of the ‘falling step’ helped to visualize the necessity of exploding punches in the Wing Tsun system’s favourite distance, the close range.

As supportive tools rubber knifes and yawaras were used, to implement details of different striking techniques. Everybody was fully concentrated, the windows and mirrors started to fog up early on.

Every seminar features a unique set of special exercises to greatly improve your skills and knowledge of the Wing Tsun system. For returning members the seminar is a great time to take charge and let the event be a point in time to redefine motivation and training goals for months to come!

For members who have just joined our classes, it’s a fabulous opportunity to get a condensed inside view in what to expect from this unique self-defense system.

Some of you take usually only private lessons, others can make it to group classes only once in a while. The special topic seminar is a chance to learn new workout routines, discover possible problem situations while working with different partners.

At this point I would like to express a big Thank You! to all of you, who go to great lengths to arrange your work and family schedule, to make it to the seminars. I know it is sometimes not easy and appreciate it even more, since it shows your dedication to your hobby, your respect for your fellow class mates, your willingness to learn.

See you Wednesday night for the main event! Good luck to all members to have signed up for their respective grading tests.


Posted by ralph haenel at 2:38 PM PDT

Newer | Latest | Older

Blog Archives - Check it out!
Read Archived Topics
Wing Tsun and Fitness Books
Upcoming Wing Tsun and Fitness books

Add our blog to your RSS Reader: Add to any RSS service

Add to My Yahoo!
Add to Google

Support:
What is RSS?


Bookmark our blog: